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Inference on effects of disrupted meal time and late sleep on cognitive and digestive imbalance in school going children

20/1/24

By:

Meenakshi Agarwal

 J Medi Ntri Vol 1 Issue 2 Page 87-90

Inference on effects of disrupted meal time and late sleep on cognitive and digestive imbalance in school going children

Meenakshi Agarwal1, Shipra Bhardwaj2, Shalie Malik3, Kshitij Bhardwaj4, Narsingh Verma5



Abstract:

Circadian rhythms, natural cycles aligning with a 24 day, control physiological and behavioral processes. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) governs these rhythms, influenced by both inherent factors such as genetics and external factors including light exposure and behavior patterns. Circadian disruption, the disturbance of these rhythms, shows in various ways and sizes, affecting health results. This disruption, worsened by elements like artificial light exposure during the night, carries implications for metabolic well-being and vulnerability to diseases. In children attending school, circadian disruption due to late night routines, timing of meals, screen time, stress, and lack of physical activity impacts several areas such as cognitive performance, risk of obesity, and mental health. Understanding how circadian rhythms, eating habits, and sleep actions interact gives indications for comprehensive approaches. This summary highlights the diverse impacts of circadian disruption on children in school, underlining the significance of addressing lifestyle aspects to alleviate negative effects.


Keywords: circadian rhythm; school going children; disrupted meal time; screentime; physical activity; parents work schedule; sleep-wake cycle.



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